Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Local News

Application Would Add Downtown Housing, Eliminate Corn Crib in Clinton

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The circa 1800 home at 151 East Main Street is slated for demolition, with an application for 32 new homes pending for the roughly seven-acre downtown site. 

Photo courtesy of the Town of Clinton

The circa 1800 home at 151 East Main Street is slated for demolition, with an application for 32 new homes pending for the roughly seven-acre downtown site. (Photo courtesy of the Town of Clinton)

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The shed locally known as The Corn Crib is posted for demolition. Photo courtesy of the Town of Clinton

The shed locally known as The Corn Crib is posted for demolition. (Photo courtesy of the Town of Clinton)

On Jan. 11, the Clinton Planning & Zoning Commission (PZC) received an application to build 32 apartments at 151-153 East Main Street, the site of a current circa 1800 house and the adjacent shed, colloquially known as The Corn Crib, both of which will be demolished under the proposal. The commission scheduled a public hearing for the application on Monday, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.

Per an application on file in the land use office, the proposed apartments will be called Sterling Sands Condominiums and would be built on two parcels on East Main Street, located on about seven acres on the north side of Route One. The owner and applicant for the property is Resync Property Solutions.

The application calls for the demolition of the house and a shed to pave the way for the construction of 32 apartments with septic systems. Zoning Enforcement Officer Kathy King pointed out that section 9.6 of the town’s zoning regulations states: “If a building or structure that was built prior to 1945 is to be demolished, no demolition shall occur for ninety (90) days after the legal notice of demolition.” The notice was announced on Jan. 11.

When reached for comment, Clinton Historical Society President Christy Pontillo said that while he was sorry to hear the house would be torn down, there wasn’t anything the society could do to stop it.

“You can’t tell them what to do with their property as long as its all legal,” Pontillo said.

While he said he would “absolutely” like to see these and similar historic structures preserved, “we don’t have the money to buy and maintain all the houses.”

Plans show that there will be a paved roadway leading into the complex from the road. The driveway will be lined by 16 separate buildings, each divided into two separate condominium units. The plans also depict a small picnic and gazebo area.

The application was discussed at an Inland Wetlands Commission meeting on Jan. 5. At the meeting, that commission unanimously determined that a wetlands permit was not needed as there was no activity being proposed within 100 feet of a wetlands.

This site had already been targeted for a similar proposal. In 2005, the PZC approved an application from applicant East Main Associates and agent Vincent A. Cimino for 36 condominiums meant for seniors. That application never came to fruition, however.

At the hearing, which will be conducted virtually via Zoom, the public will be able to speak in favor, against, or neutrally about the application. The applicant may make a more detailed presentation about the proposal and may respond to questions from the commission members. If the commission members feel they have received enough information, they may vote to close the public hearings or may continue it to a later date. Once a public hearing is closed, the application is eligible for decision.


Eric O’Connell covers news for Clinton for Zip06. Email Eric at e.oconnell@shorepublishing.com.

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